The Impossible

The Impossible

Just in from seeing The Impossible. It tells the true story of Maria and Henry Belon, played by Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor, and their three children. They take a Christmas holiday to Thailand but are swept up in the devastating tsunami of 26th December 2004. It was really tense throughout as the parents, split up in the chaos of it all, try to find each other and their kids. Excellent performances from all involved and definitely recommended.

Sightseers

Sightseers

I’m a big fan of black comedies so went to see Sightseers this afternoon in the IFI. It charts the relationship and travels of Tina and Chris who don’t have a lot of tolerance when it comes to people. Well, they murder a good few anyway. It’s really funny throughout and the performances are excellent. Recommended.

Shut Up And Play The Hits

First let me start off by saying that I hadn’t listened to an LCD Soundsystem album up until two weeks ago when I bought ‘Sound of Silver’. Last night was the premiere of “Shut Up And Play The Hits” which is the concert film directed by Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern of the band’s last ever gig in Madison Square Garden. The gig footage is the highlight and is inter cut with footage of James Murphy explaining his decision on ending the band on such a high. It’s clear that the guy isn’t sure whether he’s doing the right thing or not and he’ll only realistically know in hindsight. Fair balls to him on doing it though cos as he says himself: “I want to do other stuff. I like to make coffee”.

Herzog’s Into the Abyss

I saw Werner Herzog’s “Into the Abyss: A Tale of Death, A Tale of Life” this evening in the IFI. I’d heard good things from friends and tonight was the last screening so I didn’t want to miss it. Herzog has crafted a brilliant documentary about two men convicted of a triple homicide in Texas. Michael Perry received a death sentence for the crime, and Jason Burkett received a life sentence. The film focuses on the two convicts and various people affected by the crime. It’s balanced, affecting and never judgmental. Highly recommended.